End of Month View March 2017: a deconstructed garden

A lot of my End of Month Views in the past have lamented the lack of progress in our landscaping, so perhaps I should think of a more positive spin for this one. It’s true that, in overview, our garden does look like a mudpit:

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But those trenches are now complete; the concrete for the footings is booked in for the beginning of May: we have reached, in both literal and metaphorical senses, the lowest point of this enterprise. Indeed, it feels like we have all the separate pieces for a great garden, lying around the place: it just needs putting together.

Ornamentals

For starters, the inherited Acer, which I cherish, has suddenly broken bud, with slightly flaccid leaves accompanying tiny red flowers:

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The hardy perennials in the ornamental border have been augmented with Pulsatilla vulgaris “Alba”, Eryngium varifolium and some Delphinium “Excalibur”:

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The Cirsium rivulare “Atropurpureum” is thriving this year, protected by both pellets and a full saucer of water:

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The pellets are ferrous phosphate (largely non-toxic) so we’ve been using them liberally around the garden. Before you judge, any long-term reader of this blog will know exactly what kind of a war is waged here, with everything from Iris to squash being frequently ruined; see below for more!

The Lavender “Fathead” has survived among the crocuses and is starting to put on new growth:

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Unlike the “Hidcote”, and the salvias from last year’s cuttings workshop, all of which died off indoors over winter! I have a suspicion I’ve also thrown my Salvia “Ember’s Wish” away, somewhere along the line….

A couple of cheap-and-cheerful primroses are keeping the stalwart Pelargoniums company, alongside a new Ipheion uniflorum “RHS Wisley”:

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When I repotted that container, it was clear that it stays very wet at the bottom, despite the drainage holes; in the long term I need to think about what I will pot in it.

Lamprocapnos spectabilis “Alba” is going off like a rocket:

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Our spring containers are also shifting from Iris “Blue Note” and Crocus “Spring Beauty” to a mixture of tulip and Narcissus:

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The hellebores and cyclamen alongside the patio doors remain a joy, and the blossom on the cherry sapling outside the front of our house likewise.

Finally, by the back door are two night-scented phlox (Zaluzianskya ovata):

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Looking rather dull in that photo; but replanted immediately and already starting to fill out a bit.

Vegetables

Indoors, our lettuces “Buttercrunch” and “Tantan” have just started to sprout:

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In passing, I note that our Cosmos seedlings are doing well:

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Alongside a surprisingly good crop of parsley, which I was always told was tough to germinate and I should wait six weeks:

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This only took a couple of weeks!

Outdoors, the broad beans “Super Aguadulce” are already growing rather tall:

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Harking back to the Cirsium, there’s probably too many pellets around those Echinacea purpurea “Double Decker”, but it’s worth noting that one of them was reduced to a stump in a week! I’ve used the pellets more sparingly elsewhere, but by that point in the day I was rushing to get pellets down and photos taken.

Our five pots of garlic “Solent Wight” are sending up leaves, up by the back fence:

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Kale “Blue Scotch Curled” is just peeping through, although the new pea “Latvian” are still dormant (one of them was revealed to be shooting when I watered it, however:

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In the background, the Impatiens omeiana “Pink Nerves” is just starting off again (its first shoot of this year having wilted slightly in a too-hot growhouse) while the snowdrops are left in the green to go over.

Finally, the three peas “Latvian” that I overwintered are starting to flower! Amazing:

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I’m not convinced I’ll get much yield from them, but it’s nice for a legume to be flowering so early.

And the unexpected

The jasmine and buddleia that we can’t seem to kill are both shooting:

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Elsewhere, the removal of the privet has revealed a number of plants that were hitherto struggling underneath it; what looks like a Myosotis is going wild alongside stray spring bulbs:

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And who knows what this is a shoot of?

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Exciting, isn’t it?

(Thanks to Helen Johnstone for hosting the EOMV meme!)

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5 comments

  1. It looks like it’s starting to come together and I bet you can’t wait for May to arrive!

    Like

    • J-P · April 2

      Yes, I feel like I’ve had a delivery from Ikea, and I’ve got all of the panels and crossbeams lying around; I’m just waiting for the bolts and dowels!

      Like

  2. karen · April 9

    Plenty going on there! Do love the colour of that pea. Must get on and sow mine. So much to do. All the best. Karen

    Like

    • J-P · April 10

      Thanks! I’m not sure if overwintering was the absolute best use of the seed, but it certainly beat having those pots bare. And I’m amazed at how quickly they’ve come on: peas in early May, if the frosts permit!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: End of Month View April 2017: the last few days as a building site | The next square metre

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